Tue 06/09/16

Oh, hey! I have been looking for one of these forever. For all my going on about plume moths always being the same species, (see Fri 02/09/16), I know that the white plume also exists, because I vividly remember seeing one in my nan’s garden when I was just a kid. Sometimes people post pictures of them online too, even people I know, but I have not seen one since my childhood. And here I am, cycling into work at 7:00am on a late summer’s day, and there is one resting on the side of the warehouse. It is noticeably larger than the common and brown plumes, and it rests with the wings more spread out and feathery. That’s made my day, that has. 

White plume moth Pterophorus pentadactyla
White plume moth Pterophorus pentadactyla

Here are a couple of micromoths from nearby, a miscellaneous pale brown grass moth, and the rather attractive Carcina quercana, it’s long antennae folded under its wings and protruding out behind its body. 

 

The rest of the day’s specimens are pretty spidery I’m afraid …

Miscellaneous pale brown grass moth
Miscellaneous pale brown grass moth
Moth Carcina quercana
Moth Carcina quercana

There’s quite a lot of this going on around the outside of the warehouse; that is, hopeful males hanging around at the edge of a female’s web hoping not get eaten.

Garden or diadem spiders Araneus diadematus
Garden or diadem spiders Araneus diadematus
Garden or diadem spider Araneus diadematus
Garden or diadem spider Araneus diadematus

In most cases, a mature male is smaller than a mature female, but the males appear to grow quicker; at least I seem to be seeing some males creeping up on decidedly small females, as shown here. The male is invariably more leggy, but smaller in the body; the female is more rotund. Here we have a pair of Araneus diadematus, the common diadem spider. Here is the male a bit more close up; we had a pretty good shot of a female yesterday.

 

Below is an immature false widow that has managed to snare a harlequin ladybird. It isn’t struggling by the way; it’s gone already …

Above andbelow:  False widow spider Steatoda nobilis with prey
Above andbelow: False widow spider Steatoda nobilis with prey

And to finish off with, a full-grown male false widow with rather a juicy moth. And then one more thing! The lovely Brimstone moth Opisthograptis luteolata.

Brimstone moth Opisthograptis luteolata
Brimstone moth Opisthograptis luteolata

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