Wed 12/07/16

Brassica bug Eurydema oleracea
Brassica bug Eurydema oleracea

I saw a really nice emerald moth on the outside wall of the office block as I was coming in to work early this morning. The weather was drizzly though, and it was overcast and a bit dark, so I didn’t try to take a photo; I thought I might try later if it was still there. I didn’t think about it again until lunchtime though, and it had already bogged off. Never mind, I got some other surprisingly decent shots amongst the overgrown plot out the front. Bugs first – I don’t remember ever seeing this particular species before; note that one has bluish-grey spots and the other, larger one (probably the female) has creamy-yellow. I'm pretty sure this is the brassica bug Eurydema oleracea

Butterflies next – here are a couple of nice, closed-wing shots of small species: the common blue and the small skipper (probably). Note the partly-orange tips to the antennae, as opposed to the completely black tips on the Essex skipper from Fri 17/06/17.

Common blue Polyommatus icarus
Common blue Polyommatus icarus
Small skipper Thymelicus sylvestris
Small skipper Thymelicus sylvestris

Spider Enoplognatha ovata
Spider Enoplognatha ovata

Next, we have this rather wonderful little spider inhabiting a clump of ragwort. This is Enoplognatha ovata, a common species of about 6mm in length, which Wikipedia describes as “a formidable predator which can prey on insects many times its size.” In fact this enterprising chappie seems to have bagged three hoverflies at once, which is pretty neat going. It’s also very variable in markings; we get a lot of these in the garden at home, but very often a creamy white, sometimes a bit greenish, with a couple of lines of black spots. This one though, has a V-shaped candy stripe on its back; very nice indeed.

Spider Enoplognatha ovata
Spider Enoplognatha ovata
Larva of the cinnabar moth Tyria jacobaeae
Larva of the cinnabar moth Tyria jacobaeae

And then finally, one of the favourites of the season – the yellow-and-black hooped caterpillar of the cinnabar moth (above right). Its main foodplant is ragwort, and the adult moth is a very attractive pink and grey – a remarkable transformation!

 

Write a comment

Comments: 4

Listen to Chalkhill Blue at Bandcamp.com!

 

If you would like to listen to the music of Chalkhill Blue for free, or purchase a download or CD, please click the link below.

 

Downloads can be purchased per track or whole album.

 

CDs include a full 8-page inlay booklet with notes on each track.

 

The Chalkhill Blue Album!

 

 

See also:


iTunes !

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

YouTube

 

CD Baby

 

Fandalism

 

Soundcloud

 

MySpace

 

CLASSIC ROCK SOCIETY!

 

See the Chalkhill Blue CD at:

 

Rock Bottom Records, Whitstable 

 

Tallbird Records, Chesterfield 

 

or click on the above graphic to buy online.