Wed 11/07/2018

This morning was moth-mungous! I was cycling into work and stopped to take a quick shot of a little moth I spotted on the outside of the warehouse. But then there was a different species seemingly every few feet. All little ones, some quite similar, but the only ‘swaps’ I found were some least carpet moths, the same as yesterday. Here are the warehouse ones. The first one is a bit faded; it is certainly a pug moth, and I’m pretty sure it is the plain pug Eupithecia simpiciata. The second is a carpet moth I don’t remember ever seeing before, the common carpet – not the garden carpet, which is actually the most common one around these parts: 

Possibly the plain pug moth Eupithecia simpiciata
Possibly the plain pug moth Eupithecia simpiciata
Common carpet moth Epirrhoe alternata
Common carpet moth Epirrhoe alternata

This attractively-marked micromoth is oen of three very similar and somewhat variable species, plus a fourth which is a rare accidental import, so my book advised against identifying it for definite unless I felt like getting the dissecting tools out – and I don’t have any. All I can say for sure then, is that this one is of the genus Oegoconia. The bottom one is the very nice least carpet, which we have already seen on these pages this year. Much smaller than the common carpet on the previous page, the least holds its wings at rest much more like a wave moth than the generally triangular-shaped carpets.

Oegoconia micromoth
Oegoconia micromoth
Least carpet moth Idaea usticata
Least carpet moth Idaea usticata

Below is one of the more common pug moths, and does not usually show as colourfully as this. Generally it gives the impression of being white, with some prominent dark wing patches. The hindwings are completely hidden, giving it a very distinctive outline – this is the lime-speck pug Eupithecia centaureata. Not sure what the ‘centaur’ connection is though. The bottom specimen is one of loads of small, unobtrusive grass moths and others that all look pretty much the same. Ii is from the family Crambidae, but further than that I shall not venture

Lime-speck pug moth Eupithecia centaureata
Lime-speck pug moth Eupithecia centaureata
A pretty unremarkable crambid micromoth
A pretty unremarkable crambid micromoth

The attractively-speckled micromoth below is a different thing again; roughly the same size and shape as the above crambid, this is the bird-cherry ermine Yponomeuta evonymella. The common plume moth below that is present all year round on the warehouse walls.

Bird-cherry ermine moth Yponomeuta evonymella
Bird-cherry ermine moth Yponomeuta evonymella
Common plume moth Emmelina monodactyla
Common plume moth Emmelina monodactyla

Even that wasn't then end of it - there was a brown-tail moth 12 feet up the wall that I couldn't get to, sadly. My final moth for the day is this spectacular Jersey tiger (below left) I found on my way home. Below right is a little beetle, which I’m sure is a ladybird of some kind, and which was loose in the conservatory.

Jersey tiger moth Euplagia quadripunctaria
Jersey tiger moth Euplagia quadripunctaria
I’m sure this hairy black beetle, about 6mm long, is a ladybird of some kind, but I have not yet been able to identify it
I’m sure this hairy black beetle, about 6mm long, is a ladybird of some kind, but I have not yet been able to identify it

Write a comment

Comments: 0

Listen to Chalkhill Blue at Bandcamp.com!

 

If you would like to listen to the music of Chalkhill Blue for free, or purchase a download or CD, please click the link below.

 

Downloads can be purchased per track or whole album.

 

CDs include a full 8-page inlay booklet with notes on each track.

 

The Chalkhill Blue Album!

 

 

See also:


iTunes !

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

YouTube

 

CD Baby

 

Fandalism

 

Soundcloud

 

MySpace

 

CLASSIC ROCK SOCIETY!

 

See the Chalkhill Blue CD at:

 

Rock Bottom Records, Whitstable 

 

Tallbird Records, Chesterfield 

 

or click on the above graphic to buy online.